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KORG SP-250 or Yamaha DGX-630
  #1  
Old 11-05-2009, 01:37 PM
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Default KORG SP-250 or Yamaha DGX-630

I need a fully weighted piano/keyboard for college and have come to these as the 2 options within my price range.

Both are 88 keys

The korg has an amazing piano sound as does the yamaha but due to the fact im a huge JR fan im edging towards the yamaha due to all its synths and different voices

Was wondering if you guys could help me out with this descision ?

EDIT: just so you know i have no software/monitors to take a midi signal and turn it to a speicific voice
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  #2  
Old 11-05-2009, 02:02 PM
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It really sounds like you're pretty much made your decision already... I know they're both going to work, but realistically I think since you're asking on a JR forum... having a variety of sounds is important to you.

Go with the Yamaha DGX-630 :)

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  #3  
Old 11-05-2009, 03:11 PM
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Well, it could be an option, but I always recommend to safe money to buy something you will not outgrow fast. If you can't afford anything new - then it is better to find an "outdated" synth - good sound never gets old... if a synth was good 10 years ago, it will still be good today.

I also don't understand why people find it so important to have 88 fully weighted hammer action keys... 88 is rarely needed, even for classical piano. Hammer action works good on piano sounds, but sucks for everything else.
88 key keyboard is much heavier, bigger and more expensive.

Just saying that it is worth checking out, even if you are used to real piano action.

I find 76 semi-weighted keyboards a very convenient size.

The most important issue I have with keyboards you mentioned, that you will outgrow them fast - and if you already have experience, then there is no reason to buy them either. You will stuck with a certain number or sounds (most of them will probably be very lame), and that's it - no possibility to make your own...
For the same price you can get second hand Roland XV or a Triton (with 76 keys), for example. Especially the Triton is very cool sounding machine.

That is of course if you want to be able to create your own sounds...
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I hear it's amazing when the famous purple stuffed worm in flap-jaw space with the tuning fork- does a raw blink on Hara-kiri Rock. I need scissors! 61

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- What!? EIGHT THOUSEND!?!?!?


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Last edited by -=AnatomiC=-; 11-05-2009 at 03:22 PM..
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  #4  
Old 11-05-2009, 05:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -=AnatomiC=- View Post
Well, it could be an option, but I always recommend to safe money to buy something you will not outgrow fast. If you can't afford anything new - then it is better to find an "outdated" synth - good sound never gets old... if a synth was good 10 years ago, it will still be good today.

I also don't understand why people find it so important to have 88 fully weighted hammer action keys... 88 is rarely needed, even for classical piano. Hammer action works good on piano sounds, but sucks for everything else.
88 key keyboard is much heavier, bigger and more expensive.

Just saying that it is worth checking out, even if you are used to real piano action.

I find 76 semi-weighted keyboards a very convenient size.

The most important issue I have with keyboards you mentioned, that you will outgrow them fast - and if you already have experience, then there is no reason to buy them either. You will stuck with a certain number or sounds (most of them will probably be very lame), and that's it - no possibility to make your own...
For the same price you can get second hand Roland XV or a Triton (with 76 keys), for example. Especially the Triton is very cool sounding machine.

That is of course if you want to be able to create your own sounds...
Good advice , Thing is tho I started to play piano/keyboard about 6 weeks ago. Its a module in music college because you need a 2nd instrument

So far the things weve covered are the keys of C,D,G,E,A,F,B for both hands simultaneously, II-V-I progressions and like Chord with LH Mode with RH

So needless to say im not very good, just a huge JR fan, My main instrument is Guitar

I thought Jordans OASYS had 88fully weighted keys?


EDIT: also i am extremely curious as to why you think weighted keys suck for anything but piano sounds?? it seems like quite a bold statement, to a novice like me anyway

Last edited by Synthnoob; 11-05-2009 at 07:16 PM..
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  #5  
Old 11-06-2009, 07:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Synthnoob View Post
Good advice , Thing is tho I started to play piano/keyboard about 6 weeks ago. Its a module in music college because you need a 2nd instrument

So far the things weve covered are the keys of C,D,G,E,A,F,B for both hands simultaneously, II-V-I progressions and like Chord with LH Mode with RH

So needless to say im not very good, just a huge JR fan, My main instrument is Guitar

I thought Jordans OASYS had 88fully weighted keys?


EDIT: also i am extremely curious as to why you think weighted keys suck for anything but piano sounds?? it seems like quite a bold statement, to a novice like me anyway
That depends all on the player, personally i prefer playing on fully weighted keys.
If i've got the choice i'll non-weighted on synth and organs and weighted for the rest
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  #6  
Old 11-06-2009, 09:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Synthnoob View Post
EDIT: also i am extremely curious as to why you think weighted keys suck for anything but piano sounds?? it seems like quite a bold statement, to a novice like me anyway
First of all, historically, synths rarely had weighted keys - so most classic synth solo's you hear are played on cheap keys. Style of playing has evolved this way.

Organ playing involves lots of glissando's, and you will hurt your fingers a lot if you do it on heavy keys. Organ players love to do glissando's because organs have light waterfall keys.

Aftertouch is nearly impossible to trigger on hammer action, and you always end up having 0 or 127 (very hard to be precise). While on light keys it is a piece of cake!

Fully weighted keyboard is just a kind of a keyboard - not the best kind of a keyboard....

So I can't understand why most of the people see weighted keyboard as being one and only keyboard that all key instruments should have... doesn't make any sense at all to me...
It is only perfect for acoustic piano's and also electric piano's - but other keyboard instrument had originally other types of keyboards, so again - playing minimoog sounds on fully weighted keys, won't give a realistic feel.

I think that if you want to simulate an instrument - not only the sound counts, but also the type of keyboard and controls it has. It's just not the same, and you will play in a different way.
Not that you won't be able to play it, but the right one will always feel waaay better.

Yes, Jordan has 88 keys on his Oasys - but he has other synths with other types of keyboard.
__________________
I hear it's amazing when the famous purple stuffed worm in flap-jaw space with the tuning fork- does a raw blink on Hara-kiri Rock. I need scissors! 61

- Vegetta, what does the scouter say about his synthesizer?
- It's jay-pi eight thousaaaaaaaaaaaand!!!
- What!? EIGHT THOUSEND!?!?!?


If you hear the 50 Hz speaker buzz, and start to admire how analog, fat and warm it sounds, it's about time you find yourself a girl and get laid...

わたしは がくしです
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  #7  
Old 11-06-2009, 10:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -=AnatomiC=- View Post
Aftertouch is nearly impossible to trigger on hammer action, and you always end up having 0 or 127 (very hard to be precise). While on light keys it is a piece of cake!
i trained With pc3x aftertouch and i havé lots of contrôl over it
Quote:
Originally Posted by -=AnatomiC=- View Post
Yes, Jordan has 88 keys on his Oasys - but he has other synths with other types of keyboard.
note That hé was trained as a classical piano professional

but i totally agree with you!
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Last edited by orphe; 11-06-2009 at 10:35 AM..
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  #8  
Old 11-06-2009, 02:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -=AnatomiC=- View Post
First of all, historically, synths rarely had weighted keys - so most classic synth solo's you hear are played on cheap keys. Style of playing has evolved this way.

Organ playing involves lots of glissando's, and you will hurt your fingers a lot if you do it on heavy keys. Organ players love to do glissando's because organs have light waterfall keys.

Aftertouch is nearly impossible to trigger on hammer action, and you always end up having 0 or 127 (very hard to be precise). While on light keys it is a piece of cake!

Fully weighted keyboard is just a kind of a keyboard - not the best kind of a keyboard....

So I can't understand why most of the people see weighted keyboard as being one and only keyboard that all key instruments should have... doesn't make any sense at all to me...
It is only perfect for acoustic piano's and also electric piano's - but other keyboard instrument had originally other types of keyboards, so again - playing minimoog sounds on fully weighted keys, won't give a realistic feel.

I think that if you want to simulate an instrument - not only the sound counts, but also the type of keyboard and controls it has. It's just not the same, and you will play in a different way.
Not that you won't be able to play it, but the right one will always feel waaay better.

Yes, Jordan has 88 keys on his Oasys - but he has other synths with other types of keyboard.

Some very good points there

I think im going to go for the dgx 630 regardless as ill mostly be playing jazz, seeing as its a jazz course,and with the workload i rarely have time for my own music.... Maybe when i actually start to get good at it ill look into a proper synth.

Thanks for all your advice guys :)
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